New smartphone batteries could last for five years without breaking down

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  • #12741
    UK Sentinel
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    Smartphone batteries could last for up to five years with the imminent development of new technology, scientists have said.

    Lithium-ion batteries, which most devices currently use, are notorious for degrading over time – which is why a new smartphone will last longer on a single charge than an old one.

    This is because the graphic anodes (the negative terminal in batteries) that they use require a binder to keep it from falling apart when passing a charge between the electrolyte (the medium by which charge is passed) and the cathode (the positive terminal).

    The most common binder is poly(vinylidene fluoride), or PVDF, but researchers from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology suggest that a new binder – made from a bis-imino-acenaphthenequinone-paraphenylene (BP) copolymer – will be more effective.

    Despite the difficult scientific name, the differences between a BP copolymer and the PVDF one are surprisingly simple: the BP binder has better mechanical stability and adherence to the anode, is more conductive, and makes a thinner electrolyte which means there is less resistance getting in the way.

    It also does not react easily with the electrolyte, meaning that it will take significantly longer to break down.

    Read more.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/technology/new-smartphone-batteries-could-last-for-five-years-without-breaking-down/ar-BB1fr9JK?ocid=msedgntp

    In a completely sane world, madness is the only freedom (J.G.Ballard).

    #12742
    UK Sentinel
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    “Whereas a half-cell using PVDF as a binder exhibited only 65 per cent of its original capacity after about 500 charge-discharge cycles, the half-cell using the BP copolymer as a binder showed a capacity retention of 95 per cent after over 1700 such cycles,” says Professor Noriyoshi Matsumi, who led the study alongside Professor Tatsuo Kaneko, Senior Lecturer Rajashekar Badam, PhD student Agman Gupta, and former postdoctoral fellow Aniruddha Nag.

    Charge cycles are not easily converted into days, as they refer to the time for a battery to completely drain. Many modern smartphones can last for over 24 hours if not used intensively.

    “You complete one charge cycle when you’ve used (discharged) an amount that equals 100 per cent of your battery’s capacity — but not necessarily all from one charge”, Apple explains, as it uses of Lithium-ion batteries in its iPhones and iPads.

    https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/03/20210308-jaist.html

     

    In a completely sane world, madness is the only freedom (J.G.Ballard).

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